EQUALITY IMPACT AWARDS 2018

EQUALITY IMPACT AWARD WINNER: ELIZABETH WINDRAM

Historically and notoriously unequal, the tech industry has already come a long way in terms of promoting diversity and inclusion. Much of this success has been due to the amazing women and female-identifying people that break glass ceilings everyday.

In honor of these women and in celebration of Women’s Equality Day on August 26, BounceX launched The Equality Impact Awards, awarded to an honorary group of women in the tech, publishing and retail industries, each of whom has broken barriers, changed their companies for the better and fought for equality and gender parity.

Today, we honor one of our 2018 winners, Elizabeth Windram, Vice President of Marketing at JetBlue. Elizabeth answered 5 questions about the state of equality in the industry. Take a look!

WHAT STRATEGIES DO YOU USE TO FIGHT FOR EQUALITY IN YOUR FIELD?

I subscribe to shine theory so I’m always quick to highlight the contributions of other women. It’s helpful to have others in the room to amplify your voice and I’m happy to use my power to do that for others on the rise.

WHAT WAS YOUR DREAM JOB WHEN YOU WERE IN COLLEGE, AND HOW HAS THAT EVOLVED?

In college I was sure I wanted to produce theater. Maybe I still will someday, but that dream has evolved significantly. I’m happy creating and shepherding projects of all kinds and there is an art to business that can’t be overlooked.  

WHAT IS THE WORST DECISION YOU’VE EVER MADE? WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM IT?

Any decision led from a place of “should” has been questionable. If my heart isn’t in it and I’m working on something out of obligation, it’s not going to produce my best thinking so I’m careful to avoid that if I can.

WHAT RITUALS OR HABITS DO YOU HAVE FOR WHEN YOU WANT TO HAVE A KICK A$$ DAY?

I attack the task that I’m least looking forward to first. When I do that, my days start with a sense of accomplishment and then nothing for the rest of the day is daunting.

WHAT DOES FEMALE EMPOWERMENT MEAN TO YOU?

Empowerment is a tricky word because it can be used to describe a watered down feminism. I prefer to focus on the meaningful strides we are making at revealing and remedying the gender pay gap and opening industries previously limited to women, including aviation.